Welcome to the Hard Right

edited November 10 in General
Liberated once again from MEN OF THE WEST, just as a reminder.

https://www.menofthewest.net/welcome-to-the-hard-right/

Welcome to the Hard Right
Posted by Lector | Oct 7, 2016 |

“Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” – H.L. Mencken

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What is civilization? It is expectation. It is shared protocol. It isn’t so much about what thing is done but how one does that thing. The savage shows up at the local Wal-Mart in pajamas. The civilized man shows up dressed within the socially acceptable norms.

Aha! But what if pajamas are within the social norms? Then you’re in a civilization of savages. See, we have this notion that civilization is related to what we think of as civilized, but that is a lie. The cannibals of the darkest jungle are a civilization. But they are not civilized.

These are different concepts. Most all of us come from some civilization, but to be considered civilized, you must abide by the protocols of the civilization you are currently inhabiting.

And make no mistake. All civilizations are not equal. Equality does not exist on this earth. For example, you may admire the pygmies of New Guinea, but they haven’t launched a space program, have they? They have produced no great works of art, have they? Can you name their great composers?

But am I not judging them by the standards of my own civilization? Indeed, I am. Because I happen to very much prefer my own civilization. To paraphrase Jules his own bad self… Humans may taste like bacon and pork chops, but I would never know because I would never eat the filthy… and so it goes. No doubt the savages of the islands would think me an idiot for the refusal.

When God began His great work of setting the Israelites apart from the world, He did so by giving them rules. Boundaries. Because that is what civilization is. It is a set of boundaries and expectations that define a community. A society where anything and everything is acceptable is not a society at all. It is base savagery.

And that brings us to our war… The Culture War.

At its heart the Culture War is about the rules that make up our civilization. The progressive Left has been working to loosen and change these rules and expectations for centuries… and we on the Right have let them.

No more.

We are not Conservatives. We are not the mere weights dragging along… slowing down the plow. We are not the resistance. We are here to put those rules back where they belong. We are here to take back our birthrights. We are here to safeguard and rebuild Western Civilization.

We are the Takers.

If you find yourself thinking about hoisting the Black Flag Mr. Mencken spoke of, then please, allow me to be the first to say…

Welcome to The Hard Right.

Comments

  • befoere I read any further...I can tell this guy doesnt go to wal mart...at least not in the hood
  • why not?
  • JWF wrote: »
    why not?


    google "people of wal mart"

  • Thats disgusting shit....I seen a guy walking around in daisy duke jean shorts and a unibomber trench coat earlier....weirdos for sure.
  • We ALL have the Right to express ourselves right ?
    Funny how there is NO such "RIGHT" under the BILL OF RIGHTS or the CONSTITUTION, but under "International Treaty"

    LET THAT SINK IN FOR A MOMENT OR TWO !

    So says the gov. https://www.ag.gov.au/RightsAndProtections/HumanRights/Human-rights-scrutiny/PublicSectorGuidanceSheets/Pages/Righttofreedomofopinionandexpression.aspx#2where
    Where does the right to freedom of opinion and expression come from?

    Australia is a party to seven core international human rights treaties. The right to freedom of opinion and expression is contained in articles 19 and 20 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).

    See also articles 4 and 5 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) , articles 12 and 13 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and article 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).
    When do I need to consider the right to freedom of opinion and expression?

    You will need to consider the right to freedom of opinion and expression if you are working on legislation, a policy or a program that:

    regulates the content of any speech, publication, broadcast, display or promotion
    regulates the format or manner of any form of expression (for example requires prior approval for public protest or places restrictions on the uses of places in which protest activity may take place)
    restricts or censors media coverage, including in relation to political matters
    requires material to be approved before it may be published
    attaches criminal or civil liability to the publication of opinions or information
    regulates or restricts access to information, including on the internet
    imposes censorship or provides for classification of entertainment content, or
    regulates commercial expression (such as advertising).

    This list should not be regarded as exhaustive.

    When working on a measure that restricts freedom of expression, you should ask yourself whether the measure can be justified under the permitted grounds for restriction, whether it will be effective to achieve the desired ends, whether it impinges on freedom of expression to a greater degree than is necessary and whether there are less restrictive means of achieving the desired ends.

    The requirement to prohibit advocacy of hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination contains mandatory limitations on freedom of expression. You will need to consider the requirement if you are working on legislation, a policy or a program that regulates offensive speech or the publication or broadcast of offensive material.
    What is the scope of the right to freedom of opinion and expression?

    The right in article 19(1) to hold opinions without interference cannot be subject to any exception or restriction. The right in article 19(2) protects freedom of expression in any medium, for example written and oral communications, the media, public protest, broadcasting, artistic works and commercial advertising. The right protects not only favourable information or ideas, but also unpopular ideas including those that may offend or shock (subject to limitations). Freedom of expression carries with it special responsibilities, and may be restricted on several grounds, discussed further below.

    The CRPD provides that for people with disability, the right to accessible formats and technologies is required to enable them to exercise their right to freedom of opinion and expression.
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